Voice From The Waters Film festival 2009-schedule, venue and films

Deeply Superficial 2 (1)

DATES : 4th to 7th September 2008

TIME : 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

VENUES :

:: Alliance Francaise de Bangalore :: (The Main Venue)

:: Suchitra Film Society, Bangalore ::

:: Badami House, Bangalore ::

:: YWCA, Bangalore ::

:: MES College :: (for College Students)

:: Bal Bhavan :: (children)

Alliance Francaise de Bangalore, Vasanth Nagar

Final Festival & Conference Schedule

Friday 4th September, 2009

11.00am : Flood of Memory (Baad Ki Raat)

Dur: 11min

Country: India

Dir: Anitha Balachandran

In 2006, a devastating flood hits the Rajasthan desert of western India. The film uses a combination of live footage, charcoal and sand animations to evoke the desert landscape, and the memories of people who live within it.

11.10pm:Source to Sea: The Columbian River Swim

Dur: 90min

Country: USA/Canada

Dir: Andy Morris

Chris Swan swam 1243miles in 13months, all across the Columbia River, braving not just cold and exhaustion but pollution and encroachments which threaten to turn the once thriving and glorious water body into sewage, displacement and extinction. Andy Morris’s remarkable ‘Source to Sea’ is not just a rousing paean to human endeavor but also spans the ancient story of a river and the life and culture that thrives in and around it.  It is through these epic narratives that the film arrives on the essential connect between man and the elements; one we are in the danger of forgetting. Winner of the Best Environmental activism/ Social Justice Award and Most Inspiring Adventure Film Award.

1.15pm – 2.00pm: LUNCH

2.00pm: Toxic Waste in Papago Territory

Dur: 18min

Country: Mexico

Prod: Promedios

In a Papago Indigenous community located in Quitovac, near the boarder with Arizona the community discusses their fight against the construction of a toxic waste dump that will be a repository of waste from both the US and Mexico. Elders speak about the extinction of certain trees, birds, how toxins will become air-borne and the serious health consequences for all.

2.20pm :Switch-Off (Apaga y Vanamos)

Dur: 83min

Country: Pehuenche-Mapuche/Chile/Spain

Dir: Manel Mayol

The Biobio is an angry river, one that has resisted every attempt to tame its furious currents- from the Incas to the Spanish Armada. But with an energy giant and an uncaring government trying to construct a hydro-electric dam over its waters, the lands and histories of the indigenous Pehuenche-Mapuche tribes are a stake. However evasive and sly the officials try to be, the voice of protest booms across the land. Director Mayol captures these angry voices and images to channel them into the explosive and acclaimed ‘Switch-Off’.  Winner of Best Film at both, the prestigious Planet in Focus and Ecocinema 2005.

3.45pm – 4.00pm :TEA

4.00pm: Sujan Bandhu, a boatman’s journey

Dur: 19min

Country: India

Dir: Viplab Majumder

The river, like life, inspires us to keep moving and that is the story of this protagonist of ‘Sujan Bandhu’. More than the documentation of his life, the director feels it is the documentation of life itself.

4.20pm: Umiaq Skin Boat

Dur: 31min

Country: Canada

Dir: Jobie Weetaluktuk

Umiaq Skin Boat is a beautiful and poetic film about a group of Inuit elders in Inukjuak, Quebec who decide one summer to build the first traditional seal skin boat their community has seen in over 50 years. Umiaq Skin Boat bears witness to the resilience of the Inuit spirit in rapidly changing times.

4.50pm: Sharing Paradise

Dur: 58min

Country: USA/Indonesia

Dir: Amelia Hapsari

The fishing community of the rustic Indonesian Island of Balobaloang is facing a crisis like they have never faced before, a thoroughly modern one. For a community that stills bides by traditional practices, their waters have increasingly come under siege by fishermen from neighboring islands, who even after depleting their own island’s fish reserves, continue to engage in dynamite bombing and cyanide fishing. Director Amelia Hapsari gathers the Balobaloang community around her and together their voices shape the narrative and the story of ‘Sharing Paradise’.

5.50pm – 6.00pm

6.00pm: Invocation Film

Secret Life

Dur: 12min

Country: Poland

Dir: Joanna Hoffmann

The video refers to the contemporary quest for life and its definition. In a poetic way, it combines micro and macro scales, scientific images with everyday surrounding and experiences. It touches the subject of water as a source of life.

Inauguration of Voices from the Waters 2009

Inaugural Film

Barren Dreams

Dur: 28min

Country: Bangladesh

Dir: Anwar Chowdhury

In the midst of the Jamuna, lie the conjoined islands of Patilbari-Dighalkandi, formed as a result of erosion. ‘Barren Dreams’ evocatively and with a quiet dignity captures the lives of the children on these islands as they go about their daily routines. In the midst of hardship, the film locates a certain hope in these young hearts and in that perhaps, lies a better future for us all.
Saturday 5th September, 2009

11.00pm: Blue Gold in the Garden of Eden

Dur: 59min

Country: Turkey/Syria/Iraq/Germany

Dir: Leslie Franks

It was called the Garden of Eden. The cradle of western and Islamic civilization nourished by two ancient and legendary rivers- the Tigris and the Euphrates. These were the lands that gave the world the first principles of water management, showed how mighty rivers could be harnessed for greater good. But times have changed. Director Franke’s striking documentary delves into the social and economic consequences of the South-East-Anatolia Project and prophecies that reason for the next war in these strife-torn regions will be nothing but ‘water’.

12.00pm: Staging Cities (14min/Argentina)

Dir: Mauricio Corbalan and Pio Torroja

The question arises- how does one represent urban waste? Does it bear representation? And if so, then to what end? A furious debate on the state of the urban ecosystem and a search to overcome our own apathies.

12.15pm: Salt of the Earth (51min/France/Thailand)

Dir: Bernard Sugue

Food supply of millions people of the Isaan region in Thailand is endangered because of the salinity of the earth. The scientists installed a veritable field laboratory in the middle of the rice field but to no avail.  With no breakthrough in sight, they turn to the farmers and their intimate knowledge of the land and together, the search for a solution is begun.

1.15pm – 2.00pm: LUNCH

2.00pm; Beyond the Tsunami (21min/Myanmar)

Dir: Shin Daewe

In the aftermath of a tsunami, a fisherman and family try to come to terms with the experience of the catastrophe that changed their lives forever.

2.20pm: Cucapas & Kiliwas 9000 Years Later (58min/Mexico)

Dir: Nicolas Defosse

The haunting tragedy of two tribes, the Cucapas and Kiliwas, in Northwestern Mexico, both prohibited from plying their traditional livelihoods in their own ancient territories and are now being pushed to the brink of extinction. As the members of the tribe are forced to emigrate in search of work, their culture and language gradually dissolve into oblivion.

3.20pm: The Earth Beneath His Feet

Dur: 16min

Country: India

Dir: Saji P. Mathew

Late in life, a scientist is tormented by the fact that all his life’s work has been one great folly and instead of progress, he has instead pushing civilization closer to extinction. Will it be too late to redeem himself?

(The Director and Cast of the film will be present for the screening)

3.45pm – 4.00pm : 4.00pm

Walk with Water (Nira Nadige)

Dur: 18min

Country: India

Dir: K. Murali Mohan Kati & Manjunath H.

A sobering look at the city of Bangalore in the throes of the water crisis.

(The Directors of the film will be present for the screening)

4.30pm: Duet with the River God

Dur: 90min

Duration: India

Dir: Altaf Mazid

For Suren Boro and 6, 50, 000 people, living in 126 villages in the southern side of the River Pagladia, the river is a living god called ‘Pagla Baba’. Round the year they remain engaged in pushing the river down south, for every use of water – drinking, household, irrigation. Since the 1920s, they have constructed 13 bunds with whatever materials at the disposal – boulder, stone, sand, tree etc. ‘Duet with the River God’ chronicles a brief period in Suren’s life and through it, finds an almost mystical connection between man and river.

(The Director of the film will be present for the screening)

6.00pm – 6.10pm: Break

6.10pm: Deeply Superficial (26min/India)

Dir: Veneet Raj Bagga

‘Deeply Superficial’ is the chronicle of many meanings the waters of the river Ganga holds for the people of this diverse country. Mired in these meanings is a strange irony- where the river is venerated as holy and pure, the condition of its water and surroundings is tragic and full of filth. The film seeks out the people working to save the river and implores that each one of us can contribute our bit to retain and preserve the essence of our rivers for generations to come.

6.40pm: Blue Gold: World Water Wars (90min/USA)

Dir: Sam Bozzo

‘Blue Gold: World Water Wars’ has been one of the most important documents of the water crisis in the past year.  Screened and feted across the globe, ‘Blue Gold’ chronicles not only the deceit within the power corridors that steals an essential and ever-depleting natural resource from the people, commodifies it and attempts to sell it back to us at a price but also documents the various movements at different levels from grassroot to global that have come together in an attempt to conserve and protect water and our right to it. Produced by the makers of the acclaimed and popular documentary ‘The Corporation’ and narrated with verve by none-other-than Malcom McDowell, ‘Blue Gold’ was awarded Best Film at the prestigious Vancouver International Film Festival.

Sunday 6th September, 2009

11.00pm: Trade Winds

Dur: 5min

Country: USA

Dir: Elyssa Di Giovanni

A leisure-minded lighthouse keeper puts his kite building hobby to good use when a violent storm at sea threatens his life

11.05pm: Ice Bears of the Beaufort

Dur: 55min

Country: USA

Dir: Arthur Smith

Arthur Smith’s dreamlike ‘Ice Bears of the Beaufort’ plays witness to fragility and the otherworldly beauty of Alaska’s Beaufort sea coast, home to the polar bear. As the offshore oil and gas development threatens to wreck havoc in paradise and the government debates as to whether or not to declare and protect the area as a ‘critical habitat’, a lone resident of an Inupiat Eskimo Village captures the sounds and images that offers the sole documented proof of a mesmerizing world dangerously poised on the brink of extinction. Winner of the Special Jury Prize at the Blue Ocean Film festival, Georgia.

12.00pm: Holy Water (23min/Sweden/India)

Dir: Lotta Ekelunnd

As the cola companies deplete and pollute the essential ground water of the communities, strong feminine voices rise in protest. And while they are successful in shutting down a cola plant, the film debates the larger and ever-more-pertinent question of our age- Whose water? And to whom does it rightfully belong?

12.20pm: Damaged (73min/India)

Dir: Subrat Kumar Sahu

A scathing indictment of the atrocities committed on the tribal and farmer communities in the Indravati River Basin in the lush Eastern Ghats of Orissa who are being forced to forsake their lives and livelihoods, all for the sake of the current vogue for ‘development’. The film documents the tale of a beautiful land coming apart at the seams and losing its very essence and culture, all for the construction of a concrete façade and for a few stones that lie underneath.

1.30pm – 2.00pm: LUNCH

2.00pm: Heather and Goliath (10min/USA)

Dir: Thea Mercouffer

A rousing account of a biologist with the Army Corps of Engineers, a satirist and a bunch of boaters stand up to the authorities, and change the course of history for the embattled LA river.

2.10pm: Waterworks (22min/Bangladesh)

Dir: Anwar Chowdhury

Artist Farida Zaman describes the influence of her childhood memories of boats, fishing nets, fishes, fishermen on her life and paintings. Her country’s rivers, the life around them and her nostalgia for peace and quiet of the rural countryside inevitably find their way into her work.

2.30pm: The Damned of the Sea (70min/Morocco/France/Belgium)

Dir: Jawad Rhalib

Thousands of small Moroccan fishermen from Essaouira, the first ever sardine port in the world have to move further down south to Dakhla in the Sahara to hope to catch some fish. In the background, trawlers from foreign countries drag the waters with their death nets, killing an entire ecosystem. In the foreground, captivating portraits of desperate fishermen who’ve been robbed of their livelihood. It is a hellish struggle. ‘The Damned of the Sea’ is a much acclaimed portrayal of loss and displacement in the modern world, garnering awards at Envirofilm 2009, Monte Carlo and Nyon.

3.45pm – 4.00pm: TEA

4.00pm: Tiburon Island, Our Heart (21min/Mexico)

Prod: Promedios

Throughout their long history, the Comca’ac have survived numerous extermination attempts. Now the Mexican state wants to turn their land into business. On October 22th, 2006, remembering their dead and their political prisoners, the Comca’ac come together to save their people and their collective heart: Tiburón island.

4.20pm: Ten Canoes (90min/Australia)

Dir: Rolf de Heer and Peter Djirr

It is a land where that which comes before and all that has yet to be exists in the present, in beautiful unity. The first full-length feature ever to be made in the indigenous Australian language, the acclaimed and truly one-of-a-kind ‘Ten Canoes’ unspools story within story, time within time and spins a strange, whimsical and beautiful narrative about the land and its legends, spirits and strangers, husbands, wives, friends and neighbors.  Winner of the Special Jury Prize at Cannes’ 2006.

5.50pm – 6.00pm: BREAK

6.00pm: Invocation Film for Closing Ceremony

Cairo: the breaking up of ice

Dur: 16min

Country: USA/UK

Dir: Jacob Cartwright & Nick Jordan

19th century adventurer John James Audubon’s graphic tale of being stranded among breaking ice is juxtaposed with images of changing landscapes and ghost towns, thus combining the past and the present into an intense meditation on the changing times.

Closing Ceremony for Voices From The Waters 2009

6.30pm: Closing Film

Titas Ekti Naadir Naam

Dur: 159min

Dur: India/Bangladesh

Dir: Ritwik Ghatak

A milestone in cinema, one of the most searing and soulful chronicles of the human condition, Ghatak’s epic tragedy ‘Titas Ekti Naadir Naam’ chronicles the river Titas in the throes of a drought spell and the doom it spells for the fishing community who have built their lives and worlds along its banks.

Monday 7th September, 2009

Critical link between Climate changes

and

Food, water, livelihood and ecosystem security

A dialogue for effective change

Voices from waters – Seminar

International Film festival

Monday Sept 7th 2009. 10.00 am – 4.30pm

BADAMI HOUSE

Friday 4th September, 2009

11.00am: Raga of River Naramada (12min/India)

Dir: Rajendra Janglay

Winner of the Certificate of Merit at MIFF 2008 for its fascinating visuals and exceptional use of the Dhrupad, Director Janglay’s Raga of the River Narmada is cinema just as it is a poem as the many moods, colors and shapes of the Narmada are juxtaposed with a traditional Dhrupad recitation. The river evokes the song that echoes over the valleys and plains, setting tune to life itself, and the song plays on and the river flows endlessly, each an ancient entity with a life of its own but joined together in tradition, in culture, in nature.

11.15am: Jala Tarangani (12min/India)

Conceived & Produced by the Students & Teachers of Christel House India

Weaving notes of instruments like the flute and the guitar with the sound of the water and the students of Christel House India learn to make music in this delightful film and in the process discover a reason to celebrate and care for water as a wondrous element of everyday magic and also a scarce natural resource of immense importance for the well-being of the planet.

11.30am: Walk with Water (Nira Nadige) (18min/India)

Dir: K. Murali Mohan Kati & Manjunath H.

A sobering look at the city of Bangalore in the throes of the water crisis.

11.45am: Switch-Off (Apaga y Vanamos) (83min/ Pehuenche-Mapuche/Chile/Spain)

Dir: Manel Mayol

The Biobio is an angry river, one that has resisted every attempt to tame its furious currents- from the Incas to the Spanish Armada. But with an energy giant and an uncaring government trying to construct a hydro-electric dam over its waters, the lands and histories of the indigenous Pehuenche-Mapuche tribes are a stake. However evasive and sly the officials try to be, the voice of protest booms across the land. Director Mayol captures these angry voices and images to channel them into the explosive and acclaimed ‘Switch-Off’.  Winner of Best Film at both, the prestigious Planet in Focus and Ecocinema 2005.

1.00pm – 2.00pm: LUNCH

2.00pm :Sujan Bandhu, a boatman’s journey (19min/India)

Dir: Viplab Majumder

The river, like life, inspires us to keep moving and that is the story of this protagonist of ‘Sujan Bandhu’. More than the documentation of his life, the director feels it is the documentation of life itself.

2.20pm: Ganga from the Ground Up (45min/India/Spain)

Dir: Dir: Yves Saduvani & Miriam Ciscar

From the sky to the sea, from the ground up, Ganga takes us from a world of myths, devotion and celebration to the most crucial problem of human kind every were, water. Ganga encourages the spectator to see through her eyes and make its own conclusions to the situation she is living now a days; regarding the madness of privatisation, the construction of big dams and barrages and how to solve problems of pollution and water scarcity. No one values and respects more water than a village women that has to walk miles to get it, and that is the most common image in Ganga river basin. Joint us in this trip to heaven, earth and the underworld.

3.05pm: Bizzare World (26min/Czech Republic)

Dir: Steve L. Lichtag

The Carpathian Hills are interlaced with hundreds of small streams struggling their ways down to the valley. The Wolf Stream is one of these brooks. Although we humans consider them to be empty and forsaken, they have always been full of life.

3.30pm: Women of Dorfak (20min/Iran)

Dir: Mohammad Nami

Dorfak with a height of 2705 meters is the largest crater of Iran located east of Roodbar. The slope of the volcano is a suitable summer quarters for the people who come from humid villages and jungles for animal husbandry. On the top of the mountain there is no drinking spring water. The task of providing it is entrusted to the girls and women of Dorfak.

Saturday 5th September

11.00am: Umiaq Skin Boat (31min/Canada)

Dir: Jobie Weetaluktuk

Umiaq Skin Boat is a beautiful and poetic 30-minute film about a group of Inuit elders in Inukjuak, Quebec who decide one summer to build the first traditional seal skin boat their community has seen in over 50 years. Umiaq Skin Boat bears witness to the resilience of the Inuit spirit in rapidly changing times.

11.30am: Call of the Thirsty Jholapuri (54min/India)

Dir: Nafisa Barot

In simplest of terms, ‘Call of the Thirsty Jholapuri’ spells out the need of the hour in pursuit of a better tomorrow. Dramatizing a fable of a village girl who completes her education and returns to her village to unite the people in the river basin through a Prem Setu (Love Bridge), the film calls for a more gender just, equitable, peaceful, sustainable future.

12.30pm: Heather and Goliath (10min/USA)

Dir: Thea Mercouffer

A rousing account of a biologist with the Army Corps of Engineers, a satirist and a bunch of boaters stand up to the authorities, and change the course of history for the embattled LA river.

12.40pm: Holy Water (23min/Sweden/India)

Dir: Lotta Ekelunnd

As the cola companies deplete and pollute the essential ground water of the communities, strong feminine voices rise in protest. And while they are successful in shutting down a cola plant, the film debates the larger and ever-more-pertinent question of our age- Whose water? And to whom does it rightfully belong?

1.00pm – 2.00pm: LUNCH

2.00pm: A Sea Change (85min/USA)

Dir: Barbara Ettinger

The oceans of the world are in great turmoil and in the last few years, the waters have increasingly turned acidic, corrosive and dangerous to all forms of life. Fearing for the near future into which  his grandson and a new generation will grow into, Sven Huseby, retired professor and all-round jovial gentleman, sets out on a journey to uncover the roots, the effects and the damage of the environmental catastrophe and then, towards solutions and hope.  Evocative and charged with the spirit of adventure and discovery, ‘A Sea Change’ was awarded the prestigious Dumosa Award for Best Coastal Film.

3.30pm-3.45pm: TEA

3.45pm: Source to Sea: The Columbian River Swim (90min/USA/Canada)

Dir: Andy Morris

Chris Swan swam 1243miles in 13months, all across the Columbia River, braving not just cold and exhaustion but pollution and encroachments which threaten to turn the once thriving and glorious water body into sewage, displacement and extinction. Andy Morris’s remarkable ‘Source to Sea’ is not just a rousing paean to human endeavor but also spans the ancient story of a river and the life and culture that thrives in and around it.  It is through these epic narratives that the film arrives on the essential connect between man and the elements; one we are in the danger of forgetting. Winner of the Best Environmental activism/ Social Justice Award and Most Inspiring Adventure Film Award.

6.15pm – 6.30pm: BREAK

6.30pm: Dweepa aka The Island (100min/India)

Dir: Girish Kasaravalli

Based on the novel with the same title by Norbert D’Souza, Dweepa deals with the raging issue of building dams and the displacement of natives. Located in the backwaters of a dam, Sita Parvata is an island slowly submerging due to the rains. The government succeeds in evacuating the inmates of the island by giving them compensation for the properties they own. The village temple priest Duggajja, his son Ganapa and his daughter in law Nagi find it impossible to leave their homeland and make a living with the meagre compensation given by the government. In Ganapa’s own words, the compensation can give them food and shelter, but cannot compensate for the love and respect of their people. On the island, they are important people, but outside, they would be one among hundreds of families struggling to make a living. Centered around this complex theme, the film narrates the struggles of the family and how ultimately in the end they manage to continue life on the island.

Sunday 6th September, 2009

11.00am: Barren Dreams (28min/Bangladesh)

Dir: Anwar Chowdhury

In the midst of the Jamuna, lie the conjoined islands of Patilbari-Dighalkandi, formed as a result of erosion. ‘Barren Dreams’ evocatively and with a quiet dignity captures the lives of the children on these islands as they go about their daily routines. In the midst of hardship, the film locates a certain hope in these young hearts and in that perhaps, lies a better future for us all.

11.30pm: Waterworks (22min/Bangladesh)

Dir: Anwar Chowdhury

Artist Farida Zaman describes the influence of her childhood memories of boats, fishing nets, fishes, fishermen on her life and paintings. Her country’s rivers, the life around them and her nostalgia for peace and quiet of the rural countryside inevitably find their way into her work.

11.50pm: The Damned of the Sea (70min/Morocco/France/Belgium)

Dir: Jawad Rhalib

Thousands of small Moroccan fishermen from Essaouira, the first ever sardine port in the world have to move further down south to Dakhla in the Sahara to hope to catch some fish. In the background, trawlers from foreign countries drag the waters with their death nets, killing an entire ecosystem. In the foreground, captivating portraits of desperate fishermen who’ve been robbed of their livelihood. It is a hellish struggle. ‘The Damned of the Sea’ is a much acclaimed portrayal of loss and displacement in the modern world, garnering awards at Envirofilm 2009, Monte Carlo and Nyon.

12.20pm: Chilila Bank$ (60min/India)

Dir: Akanksha Joshi

In a canvass spread over four decades, a banyan tree, on the banks of the lake Chilika, silently whispers tales of the lake and her fisher flock. From the times when there was no export bazaar to the time when there may be no lake.

1.20pm – 2.00pm :lunch

2.00pm: Deeply Superficial (26min/India)

Dir: Veneet Raj Bagga

‘Deeply Superficial’ is the chronicle of many meanings the waters of the river Ganga holds for the people of this diverse country. Mired in these meanings is a strange irony- where the river is venerated as holy and pure, the condition of its water and surroundings is tragic and full of filth. The film seeks out the people working to save the river and implores that each one of us can contribute our bit to retain and preserve the essence of our rivers for generations to come.

2.30pm: Flood of Memory (11min/India)

Dir: Anitha Balachandran

In 2006, a devastating flood hits the Rajasthan desert of western India. The film uses a combination of live footage, charcoal and sand animations to evoke the desert landscape, and the memories of people who live within it.

2.40pm: Erosion (60min/India)

Dir: Sourav Sarangi

A large number of people have fallen victim to large scale erosion that takes place almost every year along Ganga and Padma rivers in Malda and Murshidabad districts, west Bengal, India. The situation is worsening each year….. Concerned authorities have been callous and negligent; even they are perpetuating the problems for obvious political and monetary gains …. Local inhabitants have been alleging this for a long time to deaf ears. The film is an on location report of the grave situation made over years. It seeks to disseminate the pains and penury, the anger and resoluteness of the sufferers of erosion.

3.40pm: Film: Window Facing the Sun.

Director: Bijan Zamanpira
Duration: 12 mins.

A carnival shadow-play of prayers, ceremonies, the land and the clouds as a desert community in Iran beseeches the clouds to rain water and life down upon their scorching land. A triumphant, poetic invocation of the source of life.

YWCA, Koramangala

Friday 4th September, 2009

10.30am: Holy Water (23min/Sweden/India)

Dir: Lotta Ekelunnd

As the cola companies deplete and pollute the essential ground water of the communities, strong feminine voices rise in protest. And while they are successful in shutting down a cola plant, the film debates the larger and ever-more-pertinent question of our age- Whose water? And to whom does it rightfully belong?

10.50am: A Sea Change (85min/USA)

Dir: Barbara Ettinger

The oceans of the world are in great turmoil and in the last few years, the waters have increasingly turned acidic, corrosive and dangerous to all forms of life. Fearing for the near future into which  his grandson and a new generation will grow into, Sven Huseby, retired professor and all-round jovial gentleman, sets out on a journey to uncover the roots, the effects and the damage of the environmental catastrophe and then, towards solutions and hope.  Evocative and charged with the spirit of adventure and discovery, ‘A Sea Change’ was awarded the prestigious Dumosa Award for Best Coastal Film.

12.15pm: Umiaq Skin Boat (31min/Canada)

Dir: Jobie Weetaluktuk

Umiaq Skin Boat is a beautiful and poetic 30-minute film about a group of Inuit elders in Inukjuak, Quebec who decide one summer to build the first traditional seal skin boat their community has seen in over 50 years. Umiaq Skin Boat bears witness to the resilience of the Inuit spirit in rapidly changing times.

1.00pm – 2.00pm

LUNCH

2.00pm: Sujan Bandhu, a boatman’s journey (19min/India)

Dir: Viplab Majumder

The river, like life, inspires us to keep moving and that is the story of this protagonist of ‘Sujan Bandhu’. More than the documentation of his life, the director feels it is the documentation of life itself.

2.20pm: Chilila Bank$ (60min/India)

Dir: Akanksha Joshi

In a canvass spread over four decades, a banyan tree, on the banks of the lake Chilika, silently whispers tales of the lake and her fisher flock. From the times when there was no export bazaar to the time when there may be no lake.

3.20pm: Woman of Dorfak (20min/Iran)

Dir: Mohammad Nami

Dorfak with a height of 2705 meters is the largest crater of Iran located east of Roodbar. The slope of the volcano is a suitable summer quarters for the people who come from humid villages and jungles for animal husbandry. On the top of the mountain there is no drinking spring water. The task of providing it is entrusted to the girls and women of Dorfak.

3.40pm: Discussion

Saturday 5th September, 2009

12.30pm: Jala Tarangani (12min/India)

Conceived & Produced by the Students & Teachers of Christel House India

Weaving notes of instruments like the flute and the guitar with the sound of the water and the students of Christel House India learn to make music in this delightful film and in the process discover a reason to celebrate and care for water as a wondrous element of everyday magic and also a scarce natural resource of immense importance for the well-being of the planet.

12.40pm: Barren Dreams (28min/Bangladesh)

Dir: Anwar Chowdhury

In the midst of the Jamuna, lie the conjoined islands of Patilbari-Dighalkandi, formed as a result of erosion. ‘Barren Dreams’ evocatively and with a quiet dignity captures the lives of the children on these islands as they go about their daily routines. In the midst of hardship, the film locates a certain hope in these young hearts and in that perhaps, lies a better future for us all.

1.10pm: Waterworks (22min/Bangladesh)

Dir: Anwar Chowdhury

Artist Farida Zaman describes the influence of her childhood memories of boats, fishing nets, fishes, fishermen on her life and paintings. Her country’s rivers, the life around them and her nostalgia for peace and quiet of the rural countryside inevitably find their way into her work.

1.30pm – 2.15pm: LUNCH

2.15pm: Heather and Goliath (10min/USA)

Dir: Thea Mercouffer

A rousing account of a biologist with the Army Corps of Engineers, a satirist and a bunch of boaters stand up to the authorities, and change the course of history for the embattled LA river.

2.30pm: Source to Sea: The Columbian River Swim (90min/USA/Canada)

Dir: Andy Morris

Chris Swan swam 1243miles in 13months, all across the Columbia River, braving not just cold and exhaustion but pollution and encroachments which threaten to turn the once thriving and glorious water body into sewage, displacement and extinction. Andy Morris’s remarkable ‘Source to Sea’ is not just a rousing paean to human endeavor but also spans the ancient story of a river and the life and culture that thrives in and around it.  It is through these epic narratives that the film arrives on the essential connect between man and the elements; one we are in the danger of forgetting. Winner of the Best Environmental activism/ Social Justice Award and Most Inspiring Adventure Film Award.

4.00pm: Living Water: in the beginning (23min/India)

Dir: Vinay Silva & Divya Bhatt

Living Water explores the wisdom of God manifested through water. It reflects the struggle of earth and mankind as we endeavour to understand water, its all encompassing utility and its preservation. The film implores that ‘Preservation is Communion’ is the key.
What will it profit a man if he gains the whole world and loses his soul !!!!

(Director will be present for screening and discussion)

4.20pm: Discussion

Sunday 6th September, 2009

12.30pm: Deeply Superficial (26min/India)

Dir: Veneet Raj Bagga

‘Deeply Superficial’ is the chronicle of many meanings the waters of the river Ganga holds for the people of this diverse country. Mired in these meanings is a strange irony- where the river is venerated as holy and pure, the condition of its water and surroundings is tragic and full of filth. The film seeks out the people working to save the river and implores that each one of us can contribute our bit to retain and preserve the essence of our rivers for generations to come.

1.00pm: Walk with Water (Nira Nadige) (18min/India)

Dir: K. Murali Mohan Kati & Manjunath H.

A sobering look at the city of Bangalore in the throes of the water crisis.

1.20pm – 2.00pm: LUNCH

2.00pm: Call of the Thirsty Jholapuri (54min/India)

Dir: Nafisa Barot

In simplest of terms, ‘Call of the Thirsty Jholapuri’ spells out the need of the hour in pursuit of a better tomorrow. Dramatizing a fable of a village girl who completes her education and returns to her village to unite the people in the river basin through a Prem Setu (Love Bridge), the film calls for a more gender just, equitable, peaceful, sustainable future.

3.00pm: Sharing Paradise (58min/USA/Indonesia)

Dir: Amelia Hapsari

The fishing community of the rustic Indonesian Island of Balobaloang is facing a crisis like they have never faced before, a thoroughly modern one. For a community that stills bides by traditional practices, their waters have increasingly come under siege by fishermen from neighboring islands, who even after depleting their own island’s fish reserves, continue to engage in dynamite bombing and cyanide fishing. Director Amelia Hapsari gathers the Balobaloang community around her and together their voices shape the narrative and the story of ‘Sharing Paradise’.

4.00pm: Secret Life (12min/Poland)

Dir: Joanna Hoffmann

The video refers to the contemporary quest for life and its definition. In a poetic way, it combines micro and macro scales, scientific images with everyday surrounding and experiences. It touches the subject of water as a source of life.

4.15pm:Discussion

MES Collge, Malleswaram

Friday 4th September, 2009

10.30am: Raga of River Naramada (12min/India)

Dir: Rajendra Janglay

Winner of the Certificate of Merit at MIFF 2008 for its fascinating visuals and exceptional use of the Dhrupad, Director Janglay’s Raga of the River Narmada is cinema just as it is a poem as the many moods, colors and shapes of the Narmada are juxtaposed with a traditional Dhrupad recitation. The river evokes the song that echoes over the valleys and plains, setting tune to life itself, and the song plays on and the river flows endlessly, each an ancient entity with a life of its own but joined together in tradition, in culture, in nature.

10.40am: Walk with Water (Nira Nadige) (18min/India)

Dir: K. Murali Mohan Kati & Manjunath H.

A sobering look at the city of Bangalore in the throes of the water crisis.

11.00am: Jala Tarangani (12min/India)

Conceived & Produced by the Students & Teachers of Christel House India

Weaving notes of instruments like the flute and the guitar with the sound of the water and the students of Christel House India learn to make music in this delightful film and in the process discover a reason to celebrate and care for water as a wondrous element of everyday magic and also a scarce natural resource of immense importance for the well-being of the planet.

11.15am: Women of Dorfak (20min/Iran)

Dir: Mohammad Nami

Dorfak with a height of 2705 meters is the largest crater of Iran located east of Roodbar. The slope of the volcano is a suitable summer quarters for the people who come from humid villages and jungles for animal husbandry. On the top of the mountain there is no drinking spring water. The task of providing it is entrusted to the girls and women of Dorfak.

11.35am: Ganga from the Ground Up (45min/India/Spain)

Dir: Dir: Yves Saduvani & Miriam Ciscar

From the sky to the sea, from the ground up, Ganga takes us from a world of myths, devotion and celebration to the most crucial problem of human kind every were, water. Ganga encourages the spectator to see through her eyes and make its own conclusions to the situation she is living now a days; regarding the madness of privatisation, the construction of big dams and barrages and how to solve problems of pollution and water scarcity. No one values and respects more water than a village women that has to walk miles to get it, and that is the most common image in Ganga river basin. Joint us in this trip to heaven, earth and the underworld.

12.30pm – 1.30pm: LUNCH

1.30pm :Sujan Bandhu, a boatman’s journey (19min/India)

Dir: Viplab Majumder

The river, like life, inspires us to keep moving and that is the story of this protagonist of ‘Sujan Bandhu’. More than the documentation of his life, the director feels it is the documentation of life itself.

1.50pm: Dweepa aka The Island (100min/India)

Dir: Girish Kasaravalli
Based on the novel with the same title by Norbert D’Souza, Dweepa deals with the raging issue of building dams and the displacement of natives. Located in the backwaters of a dam, Sita Parvata is an island slowly submerging due to the rains. The government succeeds in evacuating the inmates of the island by giving them compensation for the properties they own. The village temple priest Duggajja, his son Ganapa and his daughter in law Nagi find it impossible to leave their homeland and make a living with the meagre compensation given by the government. In Ganapa’s own words, the compensation can give them food and shelter, but cannot compensate for the love and respect of their people. On the island, they are important people, but outside, they would be one among hundreds of families struggling to make a living. Centered around this complex theme, the film narrates the struggles of the family and how ultimately in the end they manage to continue life on the island.

Saturday 5th September, 2009

10.30am: Deeply Superficial (26min/India)

Dir: Veneet Raj Bagga

‘Deeply Superficial’ is the chronicle of many meanings the waters of the river Ganga holds for the people of this diverse country. Mired in these meanings is a strange irony- where the river is venerated as holy and pure, the condition of its water and surroundings is tragic and full of filth. The film seeks out the people working to save the river and implores that each one of us can contribute our bit to retain and preserve the essence of our rivers for generations to come.

11.00am: Erosion (60min/India)

Dir: Sourav Sarangi

A large number of people have fallen victim to large scale erosion that takes place almost every year along Ganga and Padma rivers in Malda and Murshidabad districts, west Bengal, India. The situation is worsening each year….. Concerned authorities have been callous and negligent; even they are perpetuating the problems for obvious political and monetary gains …. Local inhabitants have been alleging this for a long time to deaf ears. The film is an on location report of the grave situation made over years. It seeks to disseminate the pains and penury, the anger and resoluteness of the sufferers of erosion.

12.00pm: Source to Sea: The Columbian River Swim (90min/USA/Canada)

Dir: Andy Morris

Chris Swan swam 1243miles in 13months, all across the Columbia River, braving not just cold and exhaustion but pollution and encroachments which threaten to turn the once thriving and glorious water body into sewage, displacement and extinction. Andy Morris’s remarkable ‘Source to Sea’ is not just a rousing paean to human endeavor but also spans the ancient story of a river and the life and culture that thrives in and around it.  It is through these epic narratives that the film arrives on the essential connect between man and the elements; one we are in the danger of forgetting. Winner of the Best Environmental activism/ Social Justice Award and Most Inspiring Adventure Film Award.

1.30pm – 2.30pm: LUNCH

2.30pm: Beyond the Tsunami (21min/Myanmar)

Dir: Shin Daewe

In the aftermath of a tsunami, a fisherman and family try to come to terms with the experience of the catastrophe that changed their lives forever.

2.50pm: Umiaq Skin Boat (31min/Canada)

Dir: Jobie Weetaluktuk

Umiaq Skin Boat is a beautiful and poetic 30-minute film about a group of Inuit elders in Inukjuak, Quebec who decide one summer to build the first traditional seal skin boat their community has seen in over 50 years. Umiaq Skin Boat bears witness to the resilience of the Inuit spirit in rapidly changing times.

Films for Jawhar Balbhavan

Trade Winds (5min/USA)

Dir: Elyssa Di Giovanni

A leisure-minded lighthouse keeper puts his kite building hobby to good use when a violent storm at sea threatens his life

Deeply Superficial (26min/India)

Dir: Veneet Raj Bagga

‘Deeply Superficial’ is the chronicle of many meanings the waters of the river Ganga holds for the people of this diverse country. Mired in these meanings is a strange irony- where the river is venerated as holy and pure, the condition of its water and surroundings is tragic and full of filth. The film seeks out the people working to save the river and implores that each one of us can contribute our bit to retain and preserve the essence of our rivers for generations to come.

Women of Dorfak (20min/Iran)

Dir: Mohammad Nami

Dorfak with a height of 2705 meters is the largest crater of Iran located east of Roodbar. The slope of the volcano is a suitable summer quarters for the people who come from humid villages and jungles for animal husbandry. On the top of the mountain there is no drinking spring water. The task of providing it is entrusted to the girls and women of Dorfak.

Bizzare World (26min/Czech Republic)

Dir: Steve L. Lichtag

The Carpathian Hills are interlaced with hundreds of small streams struggling their ways down to the valley. The Wolf Stream is one of these brooks. Although we humans consider them to be empty and forsaken, they have always been full of life.

Sujan Bandhu, a boatman’s journey (19min/India)

Dir: Viplab Majumder

The river, like life, inspires us to keep moving and that is the story of this protagonist of ‘Sujan Bandhu’. More than the documentation of his life, the director feels it is the documentation of life itself.

Ganga from the Ground Up (45min/India/Spain)

Dir: Dir: Yves Saduvani & Miriam Ciscar

From the sky to the sea, from the ground up, Ganga takes us from a world of myths, devotion and celebration to the most crucial problem of human kind every were, water. Ganga encourages the spectator to see through her eyes and make its own conclusions to the situation she is living now a days; regarding the madness of privatisation, the construction of big dams and barrages and how to solve problems of pollution and water scarcity. No one values and respects more water than a village women that has to walk miles to get it, and that is the most common image in Ganga river basin. Joint us in this trip to heaven, earth and the underworld.

Raga of River Naramada (12min/India)

Dir: Rajendra Janglay

Winner of the Certificate of Merit at MIFF 2008 for its fascinating visuals and exceptional use of the Dhrupad, Director Janglay’s Raga of the River Narmada is cinema just as it is a poem as the many moods, colors and shapes of the Narmada are juxtaposed with a traditional Dhrupad recitation. The river evokes the song that echoes over the valleys and plains, setting tune to life itself, and the song plays on and the river flows endlessly, each an ancient entity with a life of its own but joined together in tradition, in culture, in nature.

Jala Tarangani (12min/India)

Conceived & Produced by the Students & Teachers of Christel House India

Weaving notes of instruments like the flute and the guitar with the sound of the water and the students of Christel House India learn to make music in this delightful film and in the process discover a reason to celebrate and care for water as a wondrous element of everyday magic and also a scarce natural resource of immense importance for the well-being of the planet.

Walk with Water (Nira Nadige) (18min/India)

Dir: K. Murali Mohan Kati & Manjunath H.

A sobering look at the city of Bangalore in the throes of the water crisis.

Carpe Diem (1min/Italy)
Director: Sergio Cannella
‘Turn the tap off when you don’t need it. Stop wasting water’. The fundamental basic earliest ground-zero lesson in water conservation that is every mother’s continuous rant and every child’s initiation, knowingly or otherwise, into caring for his environment. Director Cannela’s film-spot is a light-hearted, surreal take on it that while underlining the importance of water to the planet and all its beings also confirms the nagging suspicion that Mama knows best.

Rainwater Harvesting (1.5min/India)

Dir: Nandita Das

Save Water. Conserve and Protect.

Barren Dreams (28min/Bangladesh)

Dir: Anwar Chowdhury

In the midst of the Jamuna, lie the conjoined islands of Patilbari-Dighalkandi, formed as a result of erosion. ‘Barren Dreams’ evocatively and with a quiet dignity captures the lives of the children on these islands as they go about their daily routines. In the midst of hardship, the film locates a certain hope in these young hearts and in that perhaps, lies a better future for us all.

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  1. Attend event for the public, industry, and press alike. green.periltd.com

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